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ArithmeticianIt is said that no amount of mages can pinpoint what pushes magic to flow. Arithmeticians believe that it can be broken down to simple mathematical equations. With them, they are able to manipulate magic to the situation that it is needed. Only after years of study is it easy enough to break down and figure it out on the fly. Being this way makes a person very precise and articulate in everything they do. These calculating strategists employ the principles of arithmetic law to pinpoint targets for their attacks.

Role: The arithmetician is often in a position to determine whatever role they choose. As a master of spellcasting, an arithmetician may fulfill many roles for the party in attack, defense, healing or utility.

Alignment: Any

Hit Die: d6

Starting Wealth: 2d6 × 10 gil (average 70 gil.) In addition, each character begins play with an outfit worth 10 gil or less.

Class Skills
The arithmetician’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int), Craft (Int), Fly (Dex), Knowledge (all) (Int), Linguistics (Int), Profession (Wis), and Spellcraft (Int).

Skill Ranks per Level: 4 + Int modifier.

Table: Arithmetician

LevelBase Attack BonusFort SaveRef SaveWill SaveSpecialMPSpell Level
Type1/2BadBadGood
1st+0+0+0+2Flexible Spellcasting (1 spell), Spell Proficiency, Mathematical Casting, Limit Breaks3
1st
2nd+1+0+0+3Arithmetic, Talent41st
3rd+1+1+1+3Magical Theorem52nd
4th+2+1+1+4Talent62nd
5th+2+1+1+4Clear Mind I, Magical Theorem, Flexible Spellcasting (2 spells)83rd
6th+3+2+2+5Talent113rd
7th+3+2+2+5Arithmancy, Magical Theorem154th
8th+4+2+2+6Talent204th
9th+4+3+3+6Cup of Life, Magical Theorem, Flexible Spellcasting (3 spells)265th
10th+5+3+3+7Clear Mind II, Talent325th
11th+5+3+3+7Split, Magical Theorem396th
12th+6/+1+4+4+8Advanced Talent476th
13th+6/+1+4+4+8Calculating Mind, Magical Theorem, Flexible Spellcasting (4 spells)567th
14th+7/+2+4+4+9Advanced Talent657th
15th+7/+2+5+5+9Magical Theorem758th
16th+8/+3+5+5+10Advanced Talent868th
17th+8/+3+5+5+10Mathematical Manipulations, Magical Theorem, Flexible Spellcasting (5 spells)989th
18th+9/+4+6+6+11Advanced Talent1109th
19th+9/+4+6+6+11Soul Bind, Magical Theorem1229th
20th+10/+5+6+6+12Clear Mind IV, Advanced Talent1359th

Class Features

All of the following are class features of the arithmetician.

Weapon and Armor Proficiency

Arithmeticians are proficient with the dagger, sling, power rod, power staff, and quarterstaff, but not with any type of armor or shield. Heavier armor interferes with an arithmetician’s movements, which can cause his spells with somatic components to fail.

Limit Breaks (Su)

At 1st level, the arithmetician receives the Limit Breaks (Defensive Numbers and Null Zero Effect).

Defensive Numbers (Su): This Limit Break reduces damage dealt to the arithmetician. For a duration of 1 round + 1 round per four arithmetician levels after 1st, any damage received by spells are reduced by half. This limit break requires only a swift action.

Null Zero Effect (Su): This Limit Break allows the arithmetician to cast spells without any spell exhaustion. For a duration of 1 round + 1 round per four arithmetician levels after 1st, any spells cast doesn’t incur any spell exhaustion. This limit break requires only a swift action.

Spell Proficiency (Ex)

Arithmeticians are considered to have the Precise Shot feat while casting spells, using class features that require ranged touch or using any magical items that require ranged touch.

Flexible Spellcasting (Su)

At 1st level, an arithmetician is able to craft and build his spells on the fly (see below). Starting at 1st level and every four arithmetician levels thereafter, an arithmetician is able to memorize a spell with all its components calculated (by 17th level, he can have 5 of these spells memorized). He gains a -1 discount to component costs when casting this specific set of spells, plus an additional -1 discount per four arithmetician levels after 1st. At the beginning of each level after 1st, the arithmetician may change out the set of memorized spells.

To cast a spell, the arithmetician must have an Intelligence score equal to at least 10 + 1 per 5 component cost. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against an arithmetician’s spell is 10 + 1 per 5 component cost + the arithmetician’s Intelligence modifier. In addition, an arithmetician gains additional MP for having a high attribute (Intelligence). An arithmetician cannot craft spells over his spell level limit. For example, a 3rd-level arithmetician can only craft spells up to 15 component cost.

Mathematical Casting (Su)

Mathematics is the fundament by which the arithmetician quantifies everything including magic. By accepting a -1 caster level penalty, the arithmetician can alter his spell with an Equation. This is a free action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity. MP cost remains the same.

The arithmetician gains one “Situation” at 1st level and every four levels thereafter to a maximum of 5. Situations are combat-based scenarios that will make a creature vulnerable to the arithmetician’s spell. A Situation can be anything that has a number that all beings in the combat have a chance of having. Some examples are [Initiative, Strength Score, Base Attack Bonus or even Number of Limbs]. No matter what the choice, it must be something that every person in combat would potentially have a number for.

Also, at 1st level and every six levels thereafter, the arithmetician gains a new “Number”. He must choose one of the following:

  • Three
  • Four
  • Five
  • Any Prime Number higher than 5

These numbers will select the targets of the arithmetician’s mathematically altered spell. By selecting one Situation he knows and one Number he knows, the spell the arithmetician now casts affects everyone (ally, enemy or himself) that has that Situation at a number divisible by the number he has chosen.

Arithmetic (Ex)

At 2nd level, an arithmetician can solve any mathematical equations almost instantly. He gains the ability to solve any mathematical problem as a free action. In addition, his analytical mind quickly accesses situations, allowing him to act while others are still debating the appropriate courses of action. The arithmetician may add his Intelligence modifier in addition to his Dexterity modifier to his initiative rolls. This stacks with the Improved Initiative feat.

Talents (Ex or Su)

As an arithmetician gains experience, he learns a number of talents that assist him in manipulating spells and other forms of magic. At 2nd level and every two levels thereafter, an arithmetician gains one talent from any talent list that he can qualify for using his arithmetician level as the level appropriate to the selected talent list. An arithmetician cannot select an individual talent more than once. Talents marked with an asterisk add effects to an arithmetician’s spellcasting ability. Only one of these talents can be applied to an individual spell and the decision must be made before the spell is cast.

Magical Theorem (Su)

At 3rd level and every other level thereafter, the arithmetician learns how to apply one type of mathematics to his spells. Magical theorems are divided into five disciplines (Algebra, Geometry, Calculus, Topology, and Statistics). The first magical theorem in each discipline may be learned by any arithmetician, but subsequent theorems may only be learned once the preceding theorems in the discipline have been mastered.

Algebra

  • Subtraction: The arithmetician simply subtracts energy from the sum total of what is required to alter his spells. When applying a metamagic feat to a spell he casts, he subtracts 1 MP the metamagic feat imposes upon the spell (which also reduces the spell level of the spell) to a minimum of 1.
  • Addition: The arithmetician adds additional energy to his spells, rendering them more effective. He adds one to each dice of variable numbers in the spell’s description.
  • Equation: By mastering algebra, the arithmetician gains the ability to link two creatures together in an equation. As a standard action, he may designate two creatures, who each receive a Will save (DC 10 + half of the arithmetician’s level + his Intelligence modifier). If both creatures fail their saving throw, they are linked together for one round per class level the arithmetician possesses. If one of the linked creatures takes damage, loses hit points, heals damage, or suffers a status effect, the other creature is affected as well, suffering the same effects, taking the same amount of damage, or healing the same amount of hit points. If one of the linked creatures dies, the remaining creature must immediately succeed at a Fortitude save against this ability’s DC or die. If one of the creatures is immune to a form of damage or a status effect, both creatures are immune.

Geometry

  • Euclidean Space: The arithmetician gains a better understanding of distances and spacial relations. He adds 5 feet for every two levels of the arithmetician class he possesses to the range of each of his spells.
  • Riemann Manifolds: The arithmetician’s understanding of geometry is such that he is able to curve his spells around obstacles. When casting any spell requiring a ranged touch attack, the arithmetician can ignore any benefit the target gains from cover, and never risks harming an ally in melee or grappling with a target.
  • Lobachevskian Dimensions: The arithmetician understands the curvature of the multi-verse and can warp it, allowing him to reach his target from safety. He may cast any of his “Touch” range spells as if they had a range of “Close,” though doing so requires a ranged touch attack rather than a melee touch attack.

Calculus

  • Integrals: The arithmetician can integrate his spells, making them more cohesive and difficult to break down. The DC to dispel an arithmetician’s spells increases by +4.
  • Derivatives: The arithmetician can differentiate his spells, allowing them to function in non-continuous units of time. After a spell is cast, the arithmetician can choose to differentiate his spell as a move action, causing the spell to become suspended. He may recall his spell as a move action, at which point it continues from the point at which it had been differentiated. The arithmetician may differentiate each spell only once.
  • Time Variance: The arithmetician understands how time functions and can break down spells cast upon him. The arithmetician can halve or increase by half the duration of any spells cast upon him as an immediate action.

Topology

  • Manifolds: The arithmetician can create complex figures by combining copies of similar figures. When determining the area of any shapeable spell, the arithmetician increases the area by one half (+50%).
  • Homeomorphism: The arithmetician learns how to transform variables from one set to another set while still preserving the values of the original. He may alter any area-affecting spell he casts so that it affects an area different from its normal area, as selected from the following list: Cylinder (10-foot radius, 30 feet high), Cone (40 feet long), Cubes (four 10-foot cubes), or a sphere (20-foot radius spread). The spell works otherwise normally in all respects.
  • Knot Theory: The arithmetician understands mathematical knots, allowing him to twist, tangle, and shape his area effect spells. The arithmetician can alter any of his area effect spells so that they exclude any square or squares within their area of effect, as determined by him.

Statistics

  • Above Average: The arithmetician learns to skew the law of averages, and may take 11 on any action on which he would normally be able to take 10. In addition, he may choose to take 11 on caster level checks, including Concentration checks, dispel checks and checks made to overcome spell resistance.
  • Eschew Dice: Whenever the arithmetician casts a spell with variable effects, he may choose to take the average on each dice instead of rolling (d3 = 2, d4 = 3, d6 = 4, d8 = 5, d10 = 6, d12 = 7).
  • Outliers: The arithmetician learns that occasional values are created which exist beyond the accepted ranged of results, and manipulates such values to her benefit. For a number of times per day equal to the arithmetician’s Intelligence modifier, he gains a +20 on a single skill check or caster level check he makes.

Clear Mind (Ex)

At 5th level, an arithmetician can regain his MP quicker. The arithmetician must be relaxed and must be free from overt distractions, such as combat raging nearby or other loud noises. For example, he could be riding in the back of a carriage and benefit from this ability. The arithmetician does not gain this recovery if he is asleep or unconscious. The arithmetician regains 1 MP per hour. This increases by 1 for every five arithmetician levels after 5th.

Arithmancy (Su)

An arithmetician can use his mathematical prowess to add metamagic effects to his spells without using spending extra MP. Starting at 7th level, the arithmetician selects two metamagic feats he does not yet have. When casting a spell, he can perform the steps below to spontaneously apply the effects of either or both of these metamagic feats, as well as any other metamagic feats he has, to the spell without spending extra MP. At 13th and 19th level, the arithmetician selects one additional metamagic feat, adding its effect to the list of possible effects he can apply to spells with this ability. An arithmetician can use this ability a number of times per day equal to his Intelligence modifier.

When casting a spell using arithmancy, the arithmetician first determines the effective spell level of the modified spell he is attempting to cast (calculated by 1 per 5 component cost, modified by metamagic feats). He can apply any number of metamagic effects to a single spell, provided she is able to cast spells of the modified spell’s effective spell level.

Refer to the Prime Constants table to determine the prime constants that can be used to cast a spell of the desired effective spell level. Then the arithmetician rolls a number of d6s equal to the number of ranks he possesses in Spellcraft. He can then perform some combination of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division upon the numbers rolled that gives rise to one of the relevant prime constants. If he can produce one of the relevant prime constants, the spell takes effect with the declared metamagic effects, and he spends MP equal to the unaltered spell’s level. If he is unsuccessful, he fails to cast the spell, the action used to cast the spell is lost, and the MP is spent. The DC of any Concentration check to cast a spell affected by this ability uses the effective spell level used to determine the prime constants, even though a successful casting of the spell does not expend additional MP.

 

Effective
Spell Level

Prime
Constants

1st

3, 5, 7

2nd

11, 13, 17

3rd

19, 23, 29

4th

31, 37, 41

5th

43, 47, 53

6th

59, 61, 67

Cup of Life (Su)

At 9th level, the arithmetician can make sure that nothing in the equation goes to waste. Whenever an arithmetician casts a spell that heals damage, if it puts himself or an ally over their max, the remaining HP is given to the next closest ally, within 30 feet, that isn’t at full HP. If they have extra HP, it keeps passing until there is nothing left.

Split (Su)

At 11th level, an arithmetician sees incoming spells as numbers and with just a thought, can split the numbers in half and transfer them to other people, including the original caster. As an immediate action, the arithmetician can make a Spellcraft check (DC 15 + double the spell’s level), if successful, can split any spell that deals healing or damage to any creature within half the range of the original spell (rounded down), including the original caster. Any spell that requires an attack roll that hits the arithmetician will automatically hit his intended target. Any saving throws required will be based on the caster who cast the spell. The arithmetician can use this ability a number of times per day equal to 3 + his Intelligence modifier.

Advanced Talents (Ex or Su)

At 12th, and every two levels thereafter, an arithmetician learns further talents to assist him in manipulating spells and other forms of magic. He may choose one of the following advanced talents from any talent list in place of a talent. Talents marked with an asterisk add effects to an arithmetician’s spellcasting ability. Only one of these talents can be applied to an individual spell and the decision must be made before the spell is cast.

Calculating Mind (Ex)

At 13th level, the arithmetician sees potential in the world around him that nobody else notices. His numerological abilities are heightened by this uncommon aptitude. Anytime he uses the arithmancy, he can use d8s instead of d6s when rolling his dice pool. He can use any combination of d6s and d8s that he wishes, as long as the number of dice does not exceed the number of ranks he possesses in Spellcraft.

Mathematical Manipulations (Su)

At 17th level, an arithmetician can reduce the radius of a spread or burst effect or shorten the length of a cone. All changes must occur in 5-foot increments, to a minimum of 5 feet. Alternatively, the arithmetician can change the area of effect of a cone spell to a line with a length equal to the spell’s range. In addition, the arithmetician can bend the line of a spell that has a line area of effect up to 90 degrees at any single point along the line’s length.

Soul Bind (Su)

At 19th level, the arithmetician begins to understand that even the body can be broken down in equations and slightly altered. Whenever he takes physical damage, if it is a multiple of the ‘Number’ he knows, as an immediate action, he is healed for half (rounded down) of the damage while the attacker takes that much damage.

Flexible Spellcasting

Components: Components are the building blocks of spells. Much as an artist uses paint to create a mural or a weaver uses colored thread to create a tapestry, an arithmetician uses components to create a spell. The arithmetician creates spells by choosing the proper components to create the spell the arithmetician wants. Many types of components exist, including Range, Duration, Heal, Illusion and Conjure. The section below goes into detail about exactly what the components can do, but for now take a look at the “Component Summary” sidebar for a quick rundown on all the component categories.

A spell always has Area, Duration and Range components — the arithmetician always has to know what the magic is going to affect, how long it’s going to last and how far it reaches. Other than those three required components, anything else in the spell is up to the arithmetician. If the arithmetician wants to make a lawyer run in fear, add a Control component. If the arithmetician wants to pick him up and throw him through a window, add a Movement component. If the arithmetician wants to learn his credit card numbers, add a Divination component. With enough practice, the arithmetician can build a spell that does all three of these things at once, or even more. The only limits are his imagination and skill at manipulating the components of magic.

If the arithmetician is playing a novice arithmetician, he might not have the power and training to accomplish all of these things. The arithmetician may be able to only make the lawyer panic momentarily, or trip him or count how much cash is in his wallet. As the arithmetician learns more about magic, he will get familiar with how it works and he will start exploring what the arithmetician can do.

Components are measured in points, just as Strength points measure how strong the arithmetician is and hit points measure how much damage he can take. Note: Just as the arithmetician spends points on different components for his spell effects, he can create a spell with multiple effects from the same component. For example, the arithmetician can create a spell that cures blindness and hit point damage at the same time (two effects from the Heal component), or a spell that protects against fire and ice (two effects from the Protect component). Pay for each effect separately as if they were different components.

Building Spells: To build a spell, follow these steps.

  1. Decide what the arithmetician wants the spell to do.
  2. Look at the component descriptions (below) to find which components are appropriate for his spell. A spell must always have Area, Duration and Range components in addition to its other effects.
  3. Add together the number of points the arithmetician spends in all the components. This is the spell’s component cost. That’s it! If the arithmetician likes the spell he designed, write down its effects and component costs so he doesn’t have to build it again from scratch; doing so is especially handy for signature spells that he uses often.

Component Summary

Area: Determines how many creatures or how much area a spell affects.
Duration: Determines how long the spell lasts.
Range: Determines how far a spell reaches.
Conjure: Summons or creates objects or creatures from elsewhere.
Control: Controls others’ minds and emotions.
Damage: Determines how much damage a spell deals.
Divination: Reveals or conceals information.
Energy: Creates, destroys or converts energy.
Enhance: Improves the target’s existing qualities.
Heal: Heals injuries and other afflictions.
Illusion: Creates false images and sensations.
Metaspell: Enhances, suppresses or alters magic.
Movement: Moves the target or affects its ability to move.
New Power: Gives the target a new ability or shape.
Protect: Protects against harmful things.

Casting a Spell: Novice arithmeticians sometimes fail at their easiest spells, and even the masters sometimes botch their creations. Every time the arithmetician tries to cast a spell, he makes a Spellcraft check; the DC is 10 + the component cost of the spell the arithmetician is casting + his exhaustion rating (see below). This check takes place at the end of the time the arithmetician spends casting the spell. (The arithmetician cannot begin a one-hour casting, roll at the start to see if he succeeds and cancel the spell and start again the next turn if he fails so he gets to reroll — he doesn’t know if he will succeed or fail until the last moment of spellcasting.) The arithmetician can take 10 on this. If the arithmetician fails this check, he fails to cast the spell. Failing to cast a spell does not use up the component points used to build the spell; the arithmetician can try again as often as he wants.

MP Costs: Like other spellcasters, an arithmetician must pay MP to cast his spells. The amount of MP is dependent on how much components are spent on the spell. (see table below)

 

Component Spell Cost

MP Cost

0 – 5

1

6 – 10

2

11 – 15

3

16 – 20

4

21 – 25

5

26 – 30

6

31 – 35

7

36 – 40

8

41+

9

 

Steps for Spellcasting: To cast a spell, follow these steps.

  1. On his turn, use an action appropriate to the spell’s casting time (by default a full-round action, though it can be longer or shorter depending on how he built the spell).
  2. Provoke an attack of opportunity from all adjacent opponents.
  3. When the arithmetician finishes casting the spell, he makes a Spellcraft check (DC 10 + the component cost of the spell he is casting + his exhaustion rating) to see if he successfully casts the spell. If the arithmetician succeeds, he moves to the next step. If the arithmetician fails, nothing happens, components are spent, MP is spent, and the arithmetician gains exhaustion rating, if any. He may try again on the his next turn.
  4. Spend component points equal to the spell’s component cost.
  5. Increase his current exhaustion rating by the spell’s exhaustion rating, if any.
  6. Spend MP according to the table above.
  7. Apply the effects of his spell.

Casting Time: By default, casting a spell is a full-round action. The arithmetician can speed it up by adding Metaspell components, though doing so costs more component points and makes the spell more difficult to cast. The arithmetician can cast the spell more slowly by adding (negative-cost) Metaspell components, increasing the casting time to a minute, 10 minutes, an hour or even a full day, which reduces the spell’s overall cost and makes the spell easier to cast.

Words and Gestures: All spells require thought, word, and action to cast.

  • Thought: The arithmetician must be capable of thought to cast a spell.
  • Word: The arithmetician must speak some magical words to begin the flow of power.
  • Action: The arithmetician must gesture in some way to direct where the power goes.

To cast a spell, an arithmetician must be able to speak clearly and have at least one hand free (arm unfettered and hand not holding anything) to gesture. The arithmetician can bypass one or both of these requirements by building Metaspell components into the spell to cast it as a silent and/or stilled spell.

Spell Exhaustion: Life is not so easy that an arithmetician can cast spells all day long without breaking a sweat. Magic is physically, mentally and spiritually taxing: the arithmetician is exploiting loopholes in reality to make things happen that shouldn’t be happening. This sort of activity can wear down even the toughest person. When the arithmetician successfully casts a spell, take its component cost and subtract his arithmetician level and 10 (treating results less than 0 as 0). This number is the spell’s exhaustion rating (ER). For example, a 16–component spell cast by a 1st-level arithmetician has an ER of: 16 (spell’s component cost) – 1 (arithmetician level) – 10 = 5. At the start of the day (after eight hours of rest), his exhaustion rating is 0. Every time the arithmetician casts a spell, add its exhaustion rating (if any) to his current exhaustion rating. For example, after casting three spells with ER 5, his exhaustion rating is 15. His exhaustion rating increases the Spellcraft DC to cast a spell, so the more exhausted he is from casting, the harder it is to cast another spell. Since his level figures into a spell’s exhaustion rating, in the long run casting simpler spells (i.e., fewer components) makes it easier for the arithmetician to cast more spells over the course of the day. A fifth-level arithmetician can cast three 15-point spells in a row without difficulty as each one has an exhaustion rating of (15 – 5 – 10) 0, whereas two 30-point spells (ER 15 each) put him at an exhaustion rating of 30, greatly reducing his chances of chances of casting any more spells that day because the Spellcraft DCs are at least 30.

A spell can never have an exhaustion rating less than 0. Sleeping for eight hours reduces an arithmetician’s exhaustion rating to 0. The arithmetician does not need to sleep for every minute of the time, but he must refrain from movement, combat, spellcasting, skill use, conversation or any other fairly demanding physical or mental task during the rest period. If his rest is interrupted, each interruption adds one hour to the total amount of time he must rest to clear his mind. If the arithmetician does not need to sleep for some reason, he still must have eight hours of restful calm to reduce his exhaustion rating to 0. An arithmetician may rest, sleep or meditate for shorter periods to recover from spell exhaustion; each hour of rest removes 10% of his current exhaustion rating.

Averting Spell Disruption: When the arithmetician is casting a spell, taking damage forces him to make a Concentration check to cast the spell. If the arithmetician fails the check, his spell is disrupted, and he stops casting. The arithmetician does not lose any component points or increase his exhaustion rating for a disrupted spell.

Ending Spellcasting: The arithmetician may interrupt his own spellcasting at any time. Doing so does not take an action (he can even do it when it is not his turn), cost component points or add to his exhaustion rating. In effect, ending a spell is totally “free.”

Dismissing Spells: The arithmetician may end one of his ongoing spells at any time as a standard action. Doing so does not cost component points, increase his exhaustion rating or provoke attacks of opportunity. The arithmetician may dismiss a spell at any range.

Group Spellcasting: Arithmeticians can combine their efforts to create spells more cheaply than they could as individuals. The group designates one arithmetician to be the leader of the casting. All participating arithmeticians contribute components to the leader’s spell (with a minimum five-point contribution).

When the spell is finished, all participants make a Spellcraft check to cast the spell as if they had cast the entire spell on their own; each arithmetician gains a +2 bonus on this Spellcraft check for every participant involved (including himself). If any of the arithmeticians fail this check, the spell fails. If all arithmeticians make the check, the spell succeeds. All participants suffer the full exhaustion rating of the spell.

All factors for normal spellcasting apply to each participant (casting time, attacks of opportunity, and so on). Example: Four first-level arithmeticians join together at the start of the day to cast a 20-component spell to protect their ravaged holdout from the werewolves who have been preying upon the arithmeticians. Each contributes five components to the effort. When the spell is finished, each makes a Spellcraft check (DC = 0 + component cost 20 + exhaustion rating 0 = 20) with a +8 bonus (4 participants x 2) to the roll. If all four succeed, the spell works and each arithmetician increases his current exhaustion rating by (component cost 20 – arithmetician level 1 – 10) 9. Though all four are just as exhausted as if they had cast the spell alone, each only spent five components instead of 20.

Spell Saves: By default, a spell allows an unwilling target to resist its effects with a saving throw. A spell’s save DC is equal to 10 + 1 per 5 component cost + his Intelligence modifier. The arithmetician can increase this DC by adding Metaspell components.

Damaging Spells: Any spell that has a damaging effect expressed as a number (hit point damage, ability damage, a reduction in hardness and so on) allows the target to make a save; success means the target takes half damage. For example, a spell that deals 6d6 points of damage on a failed save deals half damage (6d6 divided by two, not 3d6) on a successful save; a spell that reduces an object’s hardness by 10 on a failed save reduces its hardness by 5 on a successful save. The spell’s description uses the terminology (Fortitude half), (Reflex half), or (Will half) to represent this.

Component Descriptions: This section gives detailed explanations of the sorts of things each component can do when added to a spell. These are examples and are by no means comprehensive lists of what each component can do — that would be impossible and work against the goal of a flexible spellcasting class. If the arithmetician wants to create a spell and the exact effect he is looking for isn’t described here, use these effects as guidelines for how many component points his spell should cost.

Example: The arithmetician wants a spell that lets him climb walls. No climbing effect is described for any of the components. However, the New Power component lets the arithmetician levitate vertically at a speed of 20 feet. Equating levitating at speed 20 with climbing at speed 20 is reasonable, especially if the arithmetician considers the requirement of touching a wall (which levitating does not have) a fair trade for being able to move laterally (which levitating does not allow except through mundane effort). Therefore, the arithmetician can build a wall climb spell using the cost of the levitate component.

All but the weakest spells require the arithmetician to spend multiple points on each component. The more points the arithmetician spends on a component, the more effective that component is — spending five points on Duration lets his spell last much longer than spending just one point. Some effects require the arithmetician to spend at least a minimum number of points in a component — curing a disease costs 10 points of the Heal component, paralyzing someone’s mind costs five points of the Control component and so on.

The first three components (Area, Duration and Range) are marked with asterisks to indicate that all spells must have at least these three components. (Technically, the arithmetician can cast a spell that has only these components, but such a spell would have little game effect, merely causing invisible and barely perceptible magic to flow harmlessly over and through the target or area — good for some eerie ambience but little else.) Because every spell must have Area, Duration and Range components, they appear fi rst; other components appear in alphabetical order.

Some component effects are listed as a plus value, for example, +1 or +2. This means the arithmetician can stack this component effect by spending that value multiple times. For example, in the Damage component, dealing 1d6 points of damage is listed as +1, which means if the arithmetician wants his spell to deal 5d6 points of damage, spend five points.

The arithmetician cannot stack component costs that are not plus-based. (A five-foot-radius area is two component points, but the arithmetician cannot spend four to get a 10-foot-radius; the arithmetician has to spend the listed five points.) The arithmetician cannot stack negative component costs. (Using the Metaspell component to extend the casting time to an hour subtracts 3 from the spell’s component cost; the arithmetician cannot extend the casting time to two hours to subtract 6 from the spell’s component cost.)

  • Area: Determines how many individual creatures or how much area a spell affects.
  • Range: This component determines how far a spell reaches or the origin point of an area spell.
  • Duration: This component determines how long the spell lasts. The Duration refers only to ongoing magical effects, as the consequences of these effects may last much longer than the spell.
  • Conjure: This component creates objects or creatures on the spot by manipulating nearby atomic and subatomic particles. Conjured objects can have simple working parts (such as a door with hinges and a latch), but a complex item (such as a radio) requires the arithmetician to have the skill to craft such an item and make an appropriate Craft check; the arithmetician is manipulating nearby molecules (perhaps supplemented with a little dark matter), forcing them into his intended shape in moments, and if the arithmetician doesn’t have an idea how an object works, it is just a crude facsimile. Conjured creatures are called minions and are under his control; the arithmetician can modify the minions’ nature and abilities by using minion templates. It is easier to conjure a templated minion if the arithmetician has a “substrate” for that minion — appropriate material to create a minion of that type. For example, if the arithmetician wants to create a skeleton or zombie minion, a human corpse is an appropriate substrate; conjuring a fire elemental is easier at a bonfire. The substrate is incorporated into the body of the minion, lending the minion its characteristics (if appropriate to the type of minion) — a water elemental conjured at a swimming pool is nearly transparent; an earth elemental may be sandy or rocky or earthen, and a conjured zombie looks like the corpse from which it was made. When the spell ends, the minion reverts to the substrate; conjuring a zombie minion using a dead enemy as the substrate isn’t an easy way to destroy the body. Normal physics applies to the substrate. For example, if the arithmetician conjures a fire elemental from a bonfire, the fire shrinks momentarily as the minion steals some of its material, but within a round or two the bonfire is up to full strength; when the spell ends all that remains is a stolen chunk of fire, which extinguishes itself in moments if it has no fuel.
  • Control: This component covers mind control and emotions. Control effects work only on creatures with minds, not on objects or mindless creatures. If the target of a spell with a Control component has more Hit Dice than the arithmetician does, the target gain a bonus on her save equal to the difference between her Hit Dice and his. (Controlling a creature more powerful than the arithmetician is difficult.) Control effects often have descriptors, such as compulsion or fear; these are noted in parentheses. The descriptors have no effects themselves, but they affect the way other game abilities interact with these spells. (A creature may have a bonus on saves against fear effects, for example.) All Control effects are mind-affecting effects.
  • Damage: This component determines how much damage a spell deals. By default, a spell deals bludgeoning, piercing or slashing damage, similar to a club, bullet or claw, normally by hardening the air into a blunt or sharp tool and striking a target. Damage reduction affects this sort of damage, as do other defenses that affect weapon damage. If the arithmetician wants his spell to deal energy damage, add an Energy component.
  • Divination: This component reveals or conceals information. Information revealed by a spell is accurate though the information can be muddled by misinterpretation or obscured by magic.
  • Energy: This component creates, destroys or converts energy. Common energy types are earth, fire, holy, ice, lightning, shadow, water, and wind damage.
  • Enhance: This component improves qualities that the target could improve with training. Most Enhance components have a cumulative component cost: each increment costs the listed value plus the cost of all lesser values leading up to that value. For example, a +1 enhancement bonus to a weapon’s damage costs one component, a +2 bonus costs 3 (2 plus the 1 component for the +1), +3 costs a total of 3+2+1 = 6, +4 costs 4+3+2+1 = 10 and so on.
  • Heal: This component heals injuries and other afflictions. Correcting something that the target’s body can repair on its own (with time and basic medical care) is relatively easy; such injuries include a slight or moderate wound, a broken bone or an illness: the magic merely amplifies the target’s own regenerative or immune system, allowing it to fix the problem. These easy spells require only an instantaneous Duration component. Correcting afflictions that a body cannot heal on its own is more difficult. An arithmetician can “permanently” cure these conditions by building a permanent Duration healing spell (which suppresses the target’s symptoms on an ongoing basis), but if the spell ever fails the target is once again at risk. Powerful arithmeticians might even be able to raise the dead, though doing so is difficult and has negative consequences.
  • Illusion: This component creates false image and sensations. Illusions appear real but do not exert force (an illusory bullet doesn’t hurt, an illusory chair can’t support weight), though the arithmetician can compensate for this drawback with other components. (For example, the arithmetician can create a pistol illusion coupled with a Damage component, or a chair illusion and a Movement component to hold his weight.) A witness to an illusion gets a save only if he interacts with it in such a way to suggest it is unreal, such as by touching or passing through an illusory chair, failing to cook marshmallows on an illusory fire, and so on. A witness who makes this save (called “disbelieving the illusion”) realizes the illusion is unreal, though he may still have instinctive reactions to it, such as flinching if attacked. For example, once he realizes a wall of fire is just an illusion he can walk through it, even though it may feel warm with an illusory thermal component.
  • Metaspell: This component enhances, suppresses or alters magic.
  • Movement: This component moves the target through real space or affects its ability to move, primarily through telekinesis (the New Power component covers teleportation). Note that the New Power component allows some flight and levitation as well, so which sort of spell will be cheaper depends on his other abilities.
  • New Power: This component gives the target a new ability or shape. New Power spells often require more GM arbitration than others.
  • Protect: This component protects against harm. A Protect component might increase AC, energy resistance or save bonuses. Most Protect components have a cumulative component cost: each increment costs the listed value plus the cost of all lesser values leading up to that value. For example, a +1 Will save bonus costs one component, a +2 save bonus costs three (two plus the one component for the +1), +3 costs a total of 3+2+1 = 6, +4 costs 4+3+2+1 = 10 and so on.

 

Area

Component Cost

Effect

0

Affects the arithmetician; no target required; or creates or conjures the target.

+1

Five-foot-square wall, one inch thick.

+2

Each additional target beyond the first.

+2

20-foot line.

+3

10-foot cube.

1

One Medium or smaller target.

3

Five-foot radius sphere or 10-foot cone.

6

10-foot radius sphere or 20-foot cone.

11

20-foot radius sphere or 40-foot cone.

25

50-foot radius sphere or 100-foot cone.

35

100-foot radius sphere or 200-foot cone.

50

200-foot radius sphere or 400-foot cone.

80

400-foot radius sphere or 800-foot cone.

 

Range

Component Cost

Effect

1

Affects only the arithmetician (also called “personal range”).

2

Affects a creature or object the arithmetician touch. If the target is avoiding his touch (as in combat), the arithmetician must make a melee touch attack to touch the target and release the spell.

2

Originates from the arithmetician (normally used with area-affecting spells where the arithmetician wants to be ground zero for the effect).

3

30 feet (also called “close range”).

6

100 feet (also called “medium range”).

15

500 feet (also called “long range).

25

One mile (also called “extreme range”).

50

Anywhere on the planet. (In theory the arithmetician can build spells that reach farther than this, but no arithmeticians tell of such trips — yet.)

 

Duration

Component Cost

Effect

–1

The arithmetician must concentrate on the spell to maintain the effect. When his concentration ends, the built-in Duration of the spell (if any) begins. For example, the arithmetician can build a spell with that lasts for his period of concentration plus one round per level; the Duration component cost is –1 point for concentration and one point for one round per level for a total of 0 points in the Duration component.

–1

The spell has no effect until a creature fulfills a triggering condition that the arithmetician specifies (such as touching the target or reciting a password). The Duration begins when the arithmetician casts the spell, but its effects don’t activate until the trigger occurs. The spell ends at the end of the built-in Duration whether or not someone has triggered it.

0

Instantaneous.

0

A one-use effect that occurs on or before the arithmetician’s next turn (such as a spell that grants him a bonus on his next attack roll).

1

One round.

3

One minute.

6

10 minutes.

9

One hour.

12

One day. A spell that creates food or drink must have at least this Duration or the items decay before providing any nutritional benefit. (Living on conjured food with a shorter Duration eventually results in starvation, while living on short-Duration conjured water quickly results in dehydration.)

50

Permanent. The magic is ongoing; magic-negating effects can interrupt or break the spell.

 

Conjure

Component Cost

Effect

–5

Harmless minion.

–2

Appropriate minion substrate.

+1

One day’s worth of simple nutritious human food and water. The Duration must be at least one day for the spell to provide any lasting effect; otherwise, the consumables vanish from the body before they are processed (though short-Duration food is good for sating hunger while dieting).

+1

Per cubic foot of conjured water, wood, stone or iron. Add the material’s cost (below) separately. When creating walls, use the wall Area component rather than this cost.

+5

Per minion template.

2

Creates shadow or light fog that gives all within it a 20% miss chance.

8

Wood object.

10

Minor minion.

10

Creates darkness or thick fog that gives all within it a 50% miss chance.

12

Stone object.

15

Iron object.

25

Lesser minion.

40

Greater minion.

80

Superior minion.

 

Minion Statistics: Minions come in four general types: minor, lesser, greater and superior.

  • Minor Minion, Conjured Creature: CR 2; Medium animal; HD 3d8+3, hp 16; Init +2; Spd 30 ft.; AC 15, touch 12, flat-footed 13; Base Atk +2; CMB +4; CMD 16; Atk/Full Atk +5 melee (1d6+3, bite); SV Fort +4, Ref +5, Will +2; Str 15, Dex 15, Con 13, Int 3, Wis 8, Cha 3. Skills and Feats: Perception +4; Weapon Focus (bite).
  • Lesser Minion, Conjured Creature: CR 4; Medium animal; HD 6d8+24, hp 51; Init +3; Spd 30 ft.; AC 18, touch 13, flat-footed 15; Base Atk +4; CMB +7; CMD 20; Atk/Full Atk +8 melee (1d8+4, bite); SQ darkvision; SV Fort +8, Ref +8, Will +3; Str 17, Dex 17, Con 17, Int 3, Wis 12, Cha 3. Skills and Feats: Perception +6; Power Attack, Toughness, Weapon Focus (bite).
  • Greater Minion, Conjured Creature: CR 7; Large animal; HD 10d8+60, hp 105; Init +2; Spd 30 ft.; AC 18, touch 11, flat-footed 16; Base Atk +7; CMB +16; CMD 24; Atk/Full Atk +12 melee (2d6+7, bite); Space/Reach 10 ft./10 ft.; SQ darkvision; SV Fort +12, Ref +9, Will +4; Str 21, Dex 15, Con 21, Int 3, Wis 12, Cha 3. Skills and Feats: Perception +8; Combat Reflexes, Power Attack, Toughness, Weapon Focus (bite).
  • Superior Minion, Conjured Creature: CR 10; Large animal; HD 14d8+98, hp 161; Init +2; Spd 30 ft.; AC 20, touch 11, flat-footed 18; Base Atk +10; CMB +20; CMD 28; Atk/Full Atk +16 melee (2d8+9, bite); Space/Reach 10 ft./10 ft.; SQ darkvision; SV Fort +15, Ref +11, Will +5; Str 23, Dex 15, Con 23, Int 3, Wis 12, Cha 3. Skills and Feats: Perception +10; Cleave, Combat Reflexes, Power Attack, Toughness, Weapon Focus (bite).

Minion Templates: Templates are quick and easy ways to customize minions. A minion template is just a few quick adjustments to a minion’s statistics, giving the effect and feel of the appropriate minion without a ton of work.

  • Air Elemental Template: Immune to poison and wind. Attack deals +1d6 wind damage. Darkvision. +20 bonus to speed. Fly at its (modified) ground speed (perfect maneuverability). An air elemental typically looks like a tornado.
  • Demon Template: Immune to poison. Earth resistance 10, ice resistance 10, fire resistance 10. +4 bonus on damage rolls. +4 bonus on saves against spells and supernatural abilities. Darkvision.
  • Earth Elemental Template: Immune to poison and earth. +5 natural armor bonus to AC. Improved Bull Rush. Darkvision. –10 penalty to speed. An earth elemental typically looks as if it is made of earth and stone; when still, an earth elemental looks like a statue.
  • Fire Elemental Template: Immune to poison and fire. Attack deals +1d6 fire damage. Attacking it with natural weapons or unarmed attacks deals 1d6 fire damage to the attacker. Darkvision. +10 bonus to speed. Water vulnerability (takes double damage from water). A fire elemental looks like an animate flame or a “special effect” of a creature made of fire; it can stand perfectly camouflaged within fires of its size or larger.
  • Harmless Template: The minion is unable to directly cause harm — it cannot attack, use weapons, drop rocks on people from a rooftop and so on, but it could push a button that detonates a bomb. If attacked, a harmless minion does not retaliate (which makes it a good decoy for unintelligent enemies, as it lets its opponent chew on it until it expires).
  • Ice Elemental Template: Immune to poison and ice. +5 natural armor bonus to AC. Improved Bull Rush. Darkvision. –10 penalty to speed. An ice elemental typically looks as if it is made of ice and snoq; when still, an ice elemental looks like a snowman.
  • Lightning Elemental Template: Immune to poison and lightning. Attack deals +1d6 lightning damage. Darkvision. +20 bonus to speed. Fly at its (modified) ground speed (perfect maneuverability). A lightning elemental typically looks like animated jagged bolt of lightning.
  • Skeleton Template: Immune to mental attacks (including charm and compulsion effects), absorbs shadow, poison, Con damage, and stunning. Damage reduction 5/bludgeoning. Darkvision. When lying still, a skeleton looks like any other (dead) skeleton.
  • Water Elemental Template: Immune to poison and water. +5 natural armor bonus to AC. Darkvision. Swim speed equal to its ground speed +20. A water elemental looks like a free-standing wave.
  • Zombie Template: Immune to mental attacks (including charm and compulsion effects), poison, absorbs shadow, Con damage, and stunning). +10 hit points. Damage reduction 5/slashing. Darkvision. Can take only a single move or attack action each round. (A zombie can move and attack in the same round if it charges.) When lying still, a zombie looks like any other dead body in the same state of decomposition.

 

Control

Component Cost

Effect

1

Target is non-hostile or passive, but not helpless. Any attack on the target immediately breaks the spell. (Compulsion)

3

Target is shaken. (Fear)

5

Target is frightened. (Fear)

6

Dispel fear effects on the target. An ongoing spell with this component makes the target immune to fear for the Duration.

7

Target is cowering. (Fear)

7

Target is stunned. A stunned creature gets another save every round to overcome the spell. (Compulsion)

7

Inspire emotion in the target. Emotions that are inappropriate for the circumstances (such as laughter or arousal at a funeral) make the target suspicious. (Compulsion)

8

Target is charmed and regards the arithmetician as a friend. (Charm)

10

Target is helpless, usually from total mental or physical paralysis. A helpless creature gets another save every round to overcome the spell. (Compulsion)

10

The target falls asleep. Slapping or wounding a sleeping creature wakes him, but normal noise does not; awakening a sleeper is a standard action. (Compulsion)

10

Implant a suggestion of a course of activity, which the arithmetician must describe in no more than a sentence or two. The proposed activity must sound reasonable. The target automatically resists the spell if the suggestion is an obviously self-harmful act. The suggested course of activity can continue for the entire Duration. If the suggested activity can be completed in a shorter time, the spell ends when the target completes the activity. Alternatively, the arithmetician can specify conditions that will trigger an activity some time before the spell ends; if the trigger does not occur before the end of the spell, the spell ends with no effect. A very reasonable suggestion gives the target a –1 or –2 penalty on his save. (Compulsion)

10

Dispel compulsion effects on the target. An ongoing spell with this component makes the target immune to compulsion effects for the Duration.

12

Enslave the target. The target cannot resist his commands unless they are self-harmful or are a gross violation of its nature (most people object to murder, for example). If the arithmetician must directly control the target by forsaking his own actions, either through mental puppetry or a form of possession, reduce this cost by –2. If the target is of approximately hume intelligence, increase this cost by +3. (Compulsion)

13

Compel the target to perform a service or refrain from an activity for the Duration. This effect cannot compel the target to kill himself or perform acts that will result in certain death. The arithmetician can assign difficult tasks, but impossible tasks cause the spell to fail. Compelled service is more powerful than enslavement because enslavement requires active control while this effect lets the arithmetician establish guidelines for behavior. (The arithmetician does not need to micromanage the target.) (Compulsion)

 

Damage

Component Cost

Effect

+1

Per 1d6 points of damage.

+8

Per one Pool resource lost. (The target loses Pool resources; the arithmetician must declare which when he casts the spell.)

+10

Per damaging poison effect (initial and secondary damage 1d6 Strength, Dexterity or Constitution).

2

Vampiric. The spell heals another target for the same amount of hit points that the damaged target takes.

10

Nauseated. Target may take only one move action per round. This is a poison effect.

 

Divination

Component Cost

Effect

3

Reveals information that requires some scrutiny if determined by non-magical means. Examples: Learning a person’s name, finding a lost object or secret door, speaking and understanding a foreign language, detecting lies, finding an address.

4

Reveals information about the future*, up to one hour from now.

5

Reveals information that cannot be determined without interrogating the subject or using magic. Examples: Determining if the target is an undead creature, learning a magical item’s properties, remotely viewing (scrying) a creature or location, finding the quickest path from one location to another, learning someone’s greatest desire or fear.

5

Magically conceals the target from divination magic, regardless of what sort of information is desired.

10

Asks questions of the dead. This effect requires a dead body or the presence of a dead spirit. The arithmetician may ask one question per round. The dead creature knows only what it knew when it was alive.

10

Reveals information about the future*, up to one day from now.

15

Asks questions of entities beyond the world, such as demonic spirits or the departed dead. This type of spell is risky; attracting the attention of things from beyond sometimes leaves an arithmetician insane or dead.

25

Reveals information about the future*, up to one week from now.
*Future circumstances may change, and knowledge of the future makes such a change even more likely (for example, the arithmetician can intervene if he knows someone is going to die within the hour); the spell determines the most likely outcome based on current circumstances.

 

Energy

Component Cost

Effect

–1

The spell manipulates the energy of the area to deal energy damage (rather than creating or suppressing energy). For example, the spell causes a tongue of flame to shoot from a furnace.

1

The spell creates energy to deal energy damage (instead of bludgeoning, piercing or slashing damage).

 

Enhance

Component Cost

Effect

+1*

Per +1 enhancement bonus on a weapon’s attack rolls.

+1*

Per +1 enhancement bonus on a weapon’s damage.

+1*

Per +2 enhancement bonus to an item’s hardness.

+1*

Per +5 feet enhancement bonus to one type of movement (land, fly, swim and so on).

+1*

Per +1 enhancement bonus on checks with a single skill.

+2*

Per +1 enhancement bonus to an ability score.

+2*

Per –1 penalty on all d20 rolls.

+2*

Per +1 bonus on all d20 rolls.
* Cumulative

 

Heal

Component Cost

Effect

–2

Parasitic; the spell damages the arithmetician for the amount of damage the target recovers.

+1

Per 1d6 hit points of healing.

+4

Per 1 point of ability drain cured.

6

Cure exhaustion (the exhausted condition, not spell exhaustion).

15

Cure blindness or deafness (magical or not).

15

Cure supernatural affliction, such as a curse or magical disease.

 

Illusion

Component Cost

Effect

+1

Audio illusion, per 20 decibels of noise. Without this component, the illusion is utterly silent. An illusion cannot cause harm due to noise unless the arithmetician includes Damage and Energy components.

+1

Thermal illusion. One component is sufficient to duplicate the sensation of warmth or cold without pain or damage. An illusion cannot cause harm due to heat or cold unless the arithmetician includes Damage and Energy components, but adding a thermal effect is usually sufficient to convince a casual witness that the illusion is real.

+2

Olfactory illusion. One component is suffi cient for all moderate odors (food, a flower garden, a kitchen garbage can, human body odor), two for strong odors (skunk musk, sewage). An illusion cannot cause debilitating effects (such as nausea) due to stench unless the arithmetician include the appropriate components.

+3

Create illusion of one object or creature up to Small size.

+6

Create illusion of one object or creature up to Medium size.

+10

Create illusion of one object or creature up to Large size.

+20

Create illusion of one object or creature up to Huge size.

1

Creates a false aura that fools supernatural perceptions, such as making an ordinary object seem as if it had a supernatural property or concealing a supernatural object’s aura so it appears to be mundane. Supernatural scrutiny of the target always allows a Will save.

3

Scripted illusion. The illusion performs a pre-set series of actions that the arithmetician specifies when he casts the spell. These actions repeat or stop (his choice) when the script reaches its end.

10

Invisibility (normal).

20

Invisibility (greater).

 

Metaspell

Component Cost Effect

–7

Casting the spell takes one day. The arithmetician is concentrating while casting.

–3

Casting the spell takes one hour. The arithmetician is concentrating while casting.

–2

Casting the spell takes 10 minutes. The arithmetician is concentrating while casting.

–1

Casting the spell takes one minute. The arithmetician is concentrating while casting.

0

The arithmetician casts the spell as a full-round action (this is the default).

+1

Dispel magic. Choose a single spell or magical effect. Roll 1d20 and add the number of Metaspell components the arithmetician spends on the dispel attempt; the DC is 11 + the creator’s Hit Dice. If the arithmetician succeeds, the spell or magical effect ends.

+1

Per +1 increase to the spell’s save DC. Arithmeticians speak of instant death spells that targets can’t resist; these are actually damage spells with the damage and DCs boosted to very high numbers.

+1

Less taxing. Reduce the spell’s exhaustion rating by –2 per increment of this effect.

+2*

Increase the dice from the spell effect (such as healing, damage or poison) from 1d6 to 1d8 (then to 1d10, then to 1d12, which is the maximum).

1

The arithmetician casts the spell as a standard action.

2

Silent spell: the spell requires no words to cast. The arithmetician can cast it in an area of magical silence.

2

Still spell: the spell requires no gestures to cast. The arithmetician can cast it even if the arithmetician is tightly bound. (Casting while paralyzed requires the spell to be silent and still.)

4

Discriminating. An area spell affects only targets the arithmetician designates.

5

Covert spell. All obvious magical effects of the spell appear to come from a mundane source. For example, a blast of fire originates from a broken gas pipe, a death spell appears to give the target a heart attack, a fly spell appears to be the result of wires and so on. Some effects for which no realistic explanation is possible (such as a person turning into an animal) cannot be cast as covert spells. Covert spells stand up to the scrutiny of surveillance and forensic evidence.

8

The arithmetician casts the spell as a quickened spell; doing so is a free action (it takes no time), but the arithmetician can cast it only on his turn. The arithmetician may cast only one quickened spell (or use one other quickened effect) per round. Quickened spells still require gestures and words (though the arithmetician can build a quickened, silent, still spell). Quickened spells do not provoke attacks of opportunity.

10

Target consumed if the spell kills it. This effect is handy for situations in which the arithmetician doesn’t want to leave evidence. Secondary evidence is not erased; if the arithmetician throws a man through a window and then kills him with a death spell, the window is still broken and the glass may have his blood on it, but no corpse exists. This effect works only if the spell kills the target directly (usually by dealing damage); a spell that flings a target into the air so that he falls to his death cannot benefit from this effect.

12

Antimagic. Supernatural effects (hostile or friendly) do not work on the target or in the spell’s area. Arithmeticians and other supernatural creatures immediately sense when they enter an antimagic area. Antimagic can be dispelled. Overlapping antimagic effects are still antimagic (they do not cancel each other to create a “normal” area where they overlap).
* Cumulative. Each increment costs the listed value plus the cost of all lesser values leading up to that value. For example, increasing the die size from 1d6 to 1d8 costs two components, increasing the die size to 1d10 costs 6 (4 plus the two components to increase it to 1d8), and increasing the size to 1d12 costs 6+4+2 = 12.

 

Movement

Component Cost

Effect

0

Move up to 5 lbs. at speed 20 feet/round.

+1

Per 10 lbs. of the target’s weight.

+1

Per movement speed of 10 feet/round.

 

New Power

Component Cost

Effect

+4

Increase or decrease size by one size category.

+4

The target gains a natural attack such as a bite (1d6 damage) or two claws (1d4 damage each). The target is proficient with this natural attack. The arithmetician can use multiple components to give the target additional attack as long as it has suitable limbs (for example, the arithmetician cannot give a hume more than four claw attacks because a hume has only four limbs).

2

Opponents have a 20% miss chance when attacking the target, and vice versa; for example, this effect could result from portions of the target phasing in and out of reality.

4

Opponents have a 20% miss chance when attacking the target, but the target can attack without penalty; for example, this effect could result from a defensive shield that deflects incoming ranged attacks but doesn’t affect his ability to attack.

5

Telepathy. This is two-way communication that respects the privacy of his thoughts; the arithmetician must think at the target to send a thought, and vice versa.

5

Teleport* a Tiny or smaller target(s).

5

Low-light vision.

7

Darkvision 60 feet.

7

Silence. Affected creatures cannot cast spells requiring speech (though the silent Metaspell effect easily compensates for this).

7

Levitate at a speed of 20 feet/round. (This effect allows vertical motion only, though the target can maneuver laterally if she is adjacent to a wall or stable object).

9

Flight† speed of 10 feet/round; maneuverability poor.

10

Cast a spell when it is not his turn (also requires quickened casting time from the Metaspell component).

10

Cosmetic shapechanging. The arithmetician gives the target a new shape. The target does not get any special powers of the new form and retains its own ability scores, but may use the new shape’s locomotive and breathing abilities (flight for birds, swimming and water breathing for fish and so on). The arithmetician can make the target look like a different person, even a specific person, though the change is not detailed enough to duplicate fi ne details such as fingerprints, voice scans and retina scans. This sort of disguise-shapechange gives the target a +10 bonus on Disguise checks to pretend to be that person. (The arithmetician does not have to build a separate skill bonus into the spell to gain this benefi t.) The target reverts to its original form if the target dies.

10

If the target makes a full attack, he gains one extra attack at his highest base attack bonus, perhaps because he moves with extraordinary speed.

10

Reroll one d20 roll (requires instantaneous Duration and quickened casting time from the Metaspell component).

10

Teleport* a Small or smaller target(s).

10

Opponents have a 50% miss chance when attacking the target, and vice versa; for example, this effect could result from momentary blindness that afflicts the targets at specific times.

10

Transform an object into a similar material (solid, liquid, gas; animal, vegetable, mineral) or transform one of its properties (electrical conductivity, transparency, and so forth).

12

Flight† speed of 30 feet/round; maneuverability average.

18

Opponents have a 50% miss chance when attacking the target, but the target can attack without penalty; for example, this effect could result from a spell that makes the arithmetician appears to be two feet to the left of his actual location.

18

Flight† speed of 60 feet/round; maneuverability good.

20

Advanced shapechanging. The arithmetician gives the target a new shape. This effect carries all the features of the cosmetic shapechanging effect plus exceptional senses such as low-light vision and scent as well as exceptional natural abilities such as a poisonous bite. An advanced-shapechanged target is physically indistinguishable from the original (including fingerprint, voice, and retinas), though emulating a DNA test requires a sample of the duplicated individual’s blood or other DNA-rich material. Gaining the new form’s increased ability scores requires Enhance magic, which the arithmetician can include in this spell. The target reverts to its original form if killed.

20

Block teleportation in the area (or on the targets).

20

Teleport* a Medium or smaller target(s).

40

Teleport* a Large or smaller target(s).
* Teleportation is instantaneous travel from one place to another without crossing the space between. The distance the arithmetician can teleport the target depends on the spell’s Range components.

† The arithmetician can rise at half speed and decline at double speed; a medium or heavy load reduces his speed by half.

 

Protect

Component Cost

Effect

+1*

Per one point of energy resistance or five points of energy protection against one type of energy.

+1*

Per +1 bonus on a single saving throw (so +1 on all three saves costs three).

+1*

Per +1 natural bonus to AC.

+2*

Per +1 deflection bonus to AC.

+5*

Per +1 point of type-less damage reduction (DR 1/–).

10

Immunity to poison. This effect does not cure existing poison effects, but it does prevent them from dealing any more poison damage while it is in effect.

10

An aura that prevents creatures from directly attacking the subject unless they resist the spell with a Will save (a creature makes one save against the spell; success means it can directly attack the target, failure means it cannot). This aura ends if the subject attacks, and it does not prevent creatures from attacking the target with area effects.
* Cumulative